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Listing 12 publications.

Cross-Border Trade Facilitation In Twin-Border-Provinces Along EWEC

Cross-Border Trade Facilitation In Twin-Border-Provinces Along EWEC

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications, Research Papers
Pages: 89
Year: 2018
Link: Download


Implementating Guideline of Internal Control System (ICS) for Internal Inspector of Good Agriculture Practices Farmer Groups

Implementating Guideline of Internal Control System (ICS) for Internal Inspector of Good Agriculture Practices Farmer Groups

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications, Manual
Pages: 87
Year: 2018
Link: Download


Manual of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)

Manual of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)

Category: Manual, RLED-EWEC Publications
Pages: 84
Year: 2018
Link: Download


National Consultation report on Enabling Regulatory Environment for Facilitating Cross-Border Trade Along the GMS East-West Economic Corridor (EWEC)

National Consultation report on Enabling Regulatory Environment for Facilitating Cross-Border Trade Along the GMS East-West Economic Corridor (EWEC)

Category: Trade and Investment Facilitation, RLED-EWEC Publications
Pages: 46
Year: 2017
Link: Download


RLED-EWEC Brochure

RLED-EWEC Brochure

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications, Brochure
Year: 2016
Link: Download


Capacity Development Training Program on Trade Promotion and International Agreements

Capacity Development Training Program on Trade Promotion and International Agreements

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications
Year: 2015

Written by Mekong Institute

The training on “Trade Promotion and International Agreements” was organized at Huu NghiHotel, Dong Ha, Quang Tri on October 19 -23, 2015. This program aims to enhance theparticipants’ capacity in stimulating local economic development via cross-border trade which isrelevant for Quang Tri. The five day training program was taken part by 1 7 senior and mid-levelofficials from government agencies of Quang Tri Province. Among them, 15 participantssuccessfully completed the whole training program. There were altogether five modules coveredin the training. Module 1 introduced the participants with the framework of GMS Cooperationand EWEC Economic Corridor Development highlighting the involvement of Vietnam andQuang Tri in general. Module 2 exposed the participants to the policies, strategies and practicesin trade promotion and facilitation of Quang Tri Province. Module 3 familiarized the participantswith the international and regional agreements which exerted impacts towards the trade sectordevelopment of Quang Tri Province. Finally, Module 4 concluded the training by explaininghow local economies should prepare ahead to embrace the upcoming ASEAN EconomicCommunity (AEC). As the outputs of the training, the participants managed to come up with theproposals of four action plans that could be beneficial towards trade promotion development inQuang Tri Province. The evaluation results of the training demonstrated that the participantswere highly appreciative of the training and it provided the reference to conclude the trainingachieved its objectives. Through a thorough review on the feedbacks of the participants, a set ofrecommendations were made ; such as integrating SLV in the course , inviting participants fromthe private sector and the implementation of the training outside of Dong Ha ; in order toenhance the effectiveness of the training.


Post-Conflict Approaches towards Local Economic Development in Kayin State, Myanmar

Post-Conflict Approaches towards Local Economic Development in Kayin State, Myanmar

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications, Completion Reports
Year: 2015

Written by Mekong Institute

The Mekong  Institute conducted a 5-day  training programme on  “Post-Conflict Approaches towards Local Economic Development in Kayin State, Myanmar” on August 28- September 1, 2015. Fifteen participants from different government agencies and private sector attended the training. The training aimed to strengthen the skills of the local economic development actors in Kayin State  which  are  necessary  to facilitate  economic  stimulation  in  the  area.

The  training  took place at Grand Hill Hotel, Hpa-an, Kayin State. Mr.Thuta Aung, the Trainer, Ms. Than Tha Aung, the program facilitator from Mekong Institute, Dr. Thet Thet Mar and Dr. Khin Myat Soe  from  RLED-EWEC  Myanmar  office,  contributed to  the  design  and  delivery  of  the program with their technical expertise. The  training  was  composed  of  five  modules.  Module  1  on  Investment  Promotion  aimed  to expose  the  participant  to  the  concepts  of  investment  promotion  and  by  examining  how  to effective  communicate  the  opportunities  to  potential  investor  to  bring  in  responsible investments  into  Kayin  State.  Module  2  on  “ASEAN  Economic  Community  and  National Export  Strategy”  was  to  familiarize  the  participants  with  contemporary  issues  surrounding AEC  at  the  regional  level  and  the  NES  at  the  country  level.  Module  3  on  “Private-Public- Partnership  and  Post  Conflict  Economic  Reconstruction”  provided  case  studies  of  other countries and creation hypothetical scenarios for Kayin State in the future. Module 4 explored the  role  of  government  in  stimulating  economic  development  encouraging  enterprises  and entrepreneurship. The  monitoring  and  evaluation  tools  employed  throughout  the  program  confirmed  that  the program’s objectives were achieved and the program was successful. Most of the participants were very satisfied with the program as shown in the total average rating by participants on the  overall  assessment  of  the  training  program.  

As  targeted  by  the  training,  this  training enabled  the  participants  to  produce  the  action  plans  that could  be  implemented  using  the knowledge attained from the training. As the success of the training will also be measured by the  extent  in  which  participants  are  able  to  implement  their  action  plans,  MI have  planned follow-up activities to provide technical support towards their action plan implementation


Group Management and Strengthening Farmer Organizations

Group Management and Strengthening Farmer Organizations

Category: Completion Reports, RLED-EWEC Publications
Year: 2015

Written by Mekong Institute

Group Management and Strengthening Farmer Organization is considered as one of the major challenges for the agricultural development in Laos due to agricultural contribution to GDP is about 26-30% annually.At present, Lao PDRs has almost 3,630 farmer groups (FGs) with 1,864 of plantation and 1,776 of feeding groups, most of them are weak with few members, unstable and limited access to credit and market. Therefore, DAEC have the opportunity to coordinate with MI to conduct a TOT training in Khammouan province for both farmer leader and local government staff with the aim to increase their skills and experiences on necessary technics, government policy and management system for further strengthening of farmer organizations in local areas. The course program was conducted in 7 days from 10-16 March, 2015 including lectures and one-day field visit, group discussion and group action plan development. More than 14 topics have been covered and delivered to 25 participant whose came from PAFO and DAFO, Rice Mill Association and farmer groups. The field visit to successful farmer groups in Sakonnakhon, Thailand including cattle fattening group at Tayeam village and None Yangkham’s cooperatives helped participants learn about group management, production, quality and quantity control among members, value chain, access to credit and market for the sustainability of running group’s business. After the training program, most participants have improved their skills and knowledge as shown in the self-assessment result from 13% at the beginning of the course to 70% at the end. The final evaluation indicated that they can apply what they have learnt to  support and improve farmers’ activities in pilot project sites


Group Managment and Strengthening Farmer Organizations

Group Managment and Strengthening Farmer Organizations

Category: Completion Reports, RLED-EWEC Publications
Year: 2015

Written by Mekong Institute

This Training of Trainers (TOT) program aims to enhance the capacity of MI partners in pilot provincial sites to become effective capacity development providers and trainers to target local stakeholders, particularly farmers, SMEs, local economic development government officials and agribusiness development service providers. This TOT enables the participants: (i) To localize and deliver this specific training course to target local stakeholders so that jointly they can plan, implement, monitor and evaluate the performance of  farmer groups/organizations; and (ii) To acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes to become effective in their changing roles as facilitators, coordinators and service providers in the pilot project sites.

The training was conducted from 8 March to 14 March by Dr. Le Thi Hoa Sen, Senior Researcher and lecturer at the Faculty of Extension and Rural Development (FERD) and Msc. Nguyen Thien Tam, lecturer and Head of the Department of Rural Economy, FERD, Hue University, Vietnam. They both have extensive experience in conducting TOT and working with farmer organizations. Participants  were  key  informants  who  were  considered  as  resource  people  at  the provincial, district and commune level to enable the strengthening of farmer organizations at the project target area.

The   training   course   was   designed   with   5 modules:

Module 1: Understanding the TOT ProgramModule

2: Marketing planning for agricultural productsModule

3: Farmers’ awareness  on market,  market  access, farming contract  negotiation, production cost analysis, and estimating product’s priceModule

4: Group operation/management and sustaining farmer organizationsModule

5: Planning, monitoring, and evaluation of group operation

A half day field trip was conducted by visiting Huong Do farmer organization in Huong Phung commune, one of the most successful farmer organizations established by MI. The training was successfully organized. Although it lasted 7 days, all 18 participants  attended  from  beginning  to  the  end. They actively participated and contributed significantly to the training. The training evaluation demonstrated that all participants were happy with the training contents with approximately 56% of them indicating that the training contents were useful for their work, 37.5% indicated that they felt confident to apply what they learnt from the training into practice and 44% said they were able to apply the contents of the training into practice.


Myanmar Crop Selection and Value Chain Mapping Report

Myanmar Crop Selection and Value Chain Mapping Report

Category: RLED-EWEC Publications
Year: 2013

Written by Mekong Institute

Kayin State lies in the south-eastern part of Myanmar and is linked to Thailand. The rural people in Kayin State are poor. In rural areas there has been an on-going conflict between Kayin ethnic group and the government for several years. However, Kayin State is richly endowed with natural resources, including agricultural land for crop production, water resources and minerals (iron, copper, lead, etc.). Farmers grow a variety of crops in fields located on silted-land and on hill-sides. Paddy is the main crop of Kayin State. Most agricultural products are for local consumption. Following the cease fire in that region, border trade to Thailand opened officially six months ago. Myanmar exports agricultural products and others commodities from the interior through the cross-border transit points. Among products from Kayin State, only cash crops, maize and mung bean, are exported to Thailand through Myawaddy and Mae-sot.

This study identifies the alternative crop selections for cross border value chain study and for economic development. The study also identifies trading constraints in order to evaluate the market chains which involve all actors in agriculture production. The overriding goal is to improve the livelihoods of poor farmers by boosting their incomes. The Team interviewed key informants in government departments and in the private sector who participate in maize production and are included in farmer focal groups.

From the survey, it was apparent that almost all Maize grown in Myawaddy is exported to Thailand as raw materials. This trade passes through small traders and collectors. However, it should be noted the produce is not of high quality, mainly because of the heavy rainfall in the producing area.

Maize has market potential for farmers and there is high demand for the product from animal feed factories in Thailand. In addition to current production, the state government is planning to extend Maize production in Hpa-an, as winter crop, in collaboration with CP-Myanmar Group to produce quality products to command a higher price. In spite of the planning, there are production challenges and exporting policy constraints.

Maize is a suitable crop for cross-border exporting due to the capacity of small and medium participating farmers, market ability, easy market access, price stability and the participation of the private sector as a key element the value chain development. In addition, the Kayin State has a good potential for extending maize area due to land capacity, available irrigation system and favorable climatic conditions.

Summary of findings

Summary of key barriers in Maize value chain

Governance

  • Poor physical infrastructure, especially in terms of farm road, as well as lack of drying facilities and weak facilitation of extension services lead to considerable losses of marketable production.
  • Poor facilitation to set up applicable regulations in exporting product officially.
  • Unstable security in the maize production area.
  • Weak information sharing and facilitation in grading, classification and quality standards to differentiate product pricing and to reward farmers for producing a quality product. An important informational gap is the absence of SPS standards.
  • Absence of other market quality standards and certification potentially discourages production of high quality maize.
  • Weak association among farmers results in their failure to minimize the high input costs and gives them low bargaining power.
  • Insufficient government facilitation in cross-border market transactions

Market Constraints

  • Absence of efficient market distribution channel for accessing agricultural inputs, particularly seeds and agro-chemicals needed to minimize production cost.
  • High cost of hired labor and absence of labor saving devices.
  • High input cost and total dependency on imports from Thailand. Agricultural inputs are not available at the local market.
  • Absence of a transparent market transaction mechanisms for farmers to trade maize.
  • Uncertain Thai government policy to import maize from Myanmar.
  • High cost of transporting.
  • Trading season is only 2 months per year.
  • Monopsony market (single market).
  • In Hpa-an, the market is at embryonic stage. There is no local collector/local dealer/ investors yet.
  • All maize cross-border trade is done through informal channel which is difficult for government to provide the services and support to the informal value chain nodal players.

Institutional

  • Weak extension services, particularly for rural farming communities
  • High use of chemical herbicides and fertilizers may have adverse affect on environment and workers. The use of these inputs will also violate SPS regulations and may prohibit imports from Myanmar in order to protect Thai growers.
  • Absence of low cost facilities to help farmers measure moisture content of maize.
  • Lack of know-how regarding post-harvest handling and storage techniques, resulting in low prices.
  • Weak farmers associations and producing poor quality products to help pool resources and to organize community or attract investors.
  • In Myawaddy, local input supplier is not present at local market. Therefore, the market information could not share effectively to small-holder farmers

Human Resources

  • Poor on-farm storage facilities and post-harvest handling
  • Lack of information about both input and output prices
  • Shortage of seasonal labor
  • Weak facilitation of department service providers
  • Lack of experience of local traders in managing contract farming, processing and value adding activity